Rockpooling in Flushing

The wind has picked up and will ruin any chances of getting good seaweed shots this week. Too bad, but what can you do? A bit of rockpooling I guess. I took my son out to our local beach in Flushing where the rocks gently slope into Penryn River. Although there are no ‘proper’ rockpools, low tide gives access to a mixture of maerl sand and rocks that can be turned over. It is silty and definitely not very pretty, but there is always something to find. It was an especially good weekend for finding fish, seeing Shannies, Tompot blennies, Rock gobies, Gunnels, Worm Pipefish, Shore Rocklings and a tiny Eel, as well as Sea Scorpion eggs. (One Shanny was quite big and proceeded to bite my son’s hand; he was very brave and we slowly put it back.)

Invertebrates were plentiful too. The main mollusc here is the Variegated Scallop Chlamys varia, which is attached underneath every single rock. We found our smallest Great Scallop Pecten maximus as well. We found some Sea lemons Archidoris pseudoargus and lots of Yellow-plumed Sea slugs Berthella plumula (which apparently can secrete sulphuric acid when disturbed…). A small selection of what we found below, all pics taken with an Iphone.

Mud pooling off the Quay

IMG_7252I have previously posted about exploring the more muddy sites in Flushing’s Penryn River and also about catching fish with a net from the quay (here and here). This weekend had a good tide and I decided to combine the two by climbing down from the quay with my net. No blue water and clear, colourful rock pools but black mud, waste from fishing boats and in general a lot of crap, not a pretty sight/site! Mussels and (native) oysters, rock gobies, fan worms and estuary sponge are common here. Lifting one piece of waste, i found a juvenile Eel Anguilla anguilla, which was impossible to grab and place into my cuvette for a proper photograph. One cool find were bundles of squid eggs (no idea about the species). I also found tangles of the sponge Sycon ciliatum, which before I had only seen as individuals hanging from seaweeds (see here). Also visible are some Leucosolenia botryoides sponges.IMG_7265IMG_7258IMG_7276There was a heap of discarded scallop shells; I noticed they were covered by large Balanus balanus barnacles as well as the soft coral Dead man’s fingers Alcyonium digitatum (I had never seen this before but this could only be one thing!). The lower parts of the quaysides were covered in estuary and breadcrumb sponges and especially in droopy Morchellium (or Aplidium?) sea squirts. Although generally an ‘ugly’ habitat with lots of waste to boot, still plenty of interesting finds.IMG_7279IMG_7284IMG_7282IMG_7287

quick rockpooling session

Went to Castle Beach in Falmouth after work this week for a bit of rock pooling. I saw a beautiful grey-red Sea scorpion Taurulus bubalis; I could not tell the difference) or but it was gone before I could even attempt to catch it. Below the much easier to spot Shanny Lipophrys pholis Giant goby Gobius cobitis (after lifting up a rock):

IMG_2297

I spotted a small Eel Anguilla anguilla for the first time on the beach; it was quick but I could scoop it up from a very shallow sandy pool. Nice, but not of interest for the aquarium!

IMG_2311

IMG_2322

Also spotted for the first time: a European sting winkle Ocenebra erinacea. This I took home for the aquarium:

IMG_2343

A tiny white Edible crab Cancer pagurus. I do not know if it is an albino or whether juveniles are generally white. I had a bigger one in the aquarium (carapace width 6 cm or so), but every night the light went out it came out of its burrow and started to rearranging the tank, knocking big rocks against the glass. This one is only one cm so I hope it will be better behaved:

IMG_2331