Seaweed Assemblages

I have been trying to make the most of the seaweed season the past few weeks. This mainly entails lying motionless in two feet of 9C water, taking 100s of pics until my finger refuses to press the shutter lever. It is a lot of fun! Yesterday was a no go unfortunately: the easterlies picked up (there were even surfers in the water which is very rare at Gylly Beach) and the water was very milky. I managed to go a few times last week though and here are some photos of seaweed assemblages with names (there are a few species hidden that I did not bother with, so these do not fully do justice to the biodiversity).

Red and Green

Just a very quick post: went for a snorkel today as the sun was shining; there was some wind so the viz was not the best. Snapped a lot of ‘6’s but I liked the green Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) and the red Sphaerococcus coronopifolius (berry wart cress). Both are plants (‘Plantae’) and not related to the brown kelp in the background (which is more closely related to potato blight!).

Rockpooling in Flushing

The wind has picked up and will ruin any chances of getting good seaweed shots this week. Too bad, but what can you do? A bit of rockpooling I guess. I took my son out to our local beach in Flushing where the rocks gently slope into Penryn River. Although there are no ‘proper’ rockpools, low tide gives access to a mixture of maerl sand and rocks that can be turned over. It is silty and definitely not very pretty, but there is always something to find. It was an especially good weekend for finding fish, seeing Shannies, Tompot blennies, Rock gobies, Gunnels, Worm Pipefish, Shore Rocklings and a tiny Eel, as well as Sea Scorpion eggs. (One Shanny was quite big and proceeded to bite my son’s hand; he was very brave and we slowly put it back.)

Invertebrates were plentiful too. The main mollusc here is the Variegated Scallop Chlamys varia, which is attached underneath every single rock. We found our smallest Great Scallop Pecten maximus as well. We found some Sea lemons Archidoris pseudoargus and lots of Yellow-plumed Sea slugs Berthella plumula (which apparently can secrete sulphuric acid when disturbed…). A small selection of what we found below, all pics taken with an Iphone.

An Bollenessor is Back

It has been a wile since I last posted. This winter was long and dreary, the sea choppy and grey. I managed to do some rock pooling, and took a bunch of pictures, which I probably should have posted… The good news is that a mishap with my camera housing last year resulted in Olympus giving me a new model housing + a new model camera to fit (OMD EM1 mark 2) AND a new dome, lucky me! Regular readers of this blog know I get very excited in March, as this is when the seaweeds look at their best. This week the tides were low and the wind conditions favourable (the sun was not always out unfortunately), so I made sure to go in the water every day. The water is cold (9C), especially after being in for 2 hours, but it is all worth it. The seaweed growth was lush, with species literally growing on top of each other. I tried to shoot with strobes, but this proved too difficult and switched to natural light. Keeping ISO at 200, I aimed to lower shutter speed to 1/30, managing an F stop of between 5 and 8, depending on cloud cover. I now get the hang of that, but it is difficult to keep photos well-exposed, with enough depth of field and maintain sharpness. Below some examples. I am lazy and will not add seaweed names (but see the Seaweed Gallery page at the top if you are interested). When the tides are low again at the end of next week I hope to go out again!

The Hidden World of Algae exhibition

A while back I was lucky to be one of the two winners of the Hilda-Canter Lund prize (see this post). An exhibition featuring seaweed photography organised by the British Phycological Society at the University of Nottingham has now been opened (outdoors rather than indoors for obvious reasons). The nice thing is that the organisers have also put the exhibit online, if you are interested, please click this link.

Necklace Shell

A quick post as it has been a while…..Last Sunday we went on a walk on sunny Carne Beach on the Roseland Peninsula. The primary aim was to get some fresh air, the second to find some dahlia anemones to bring home to the aquarium (we succeeded in that) and the third to do a bit of beach combing. Nothing much washed up, but we did find a number of live Necklace Shells (Euspira catena). These gastropods hunt bivalves in and on the sand; if you see shell valves with a neat little hole in them, you know they were victims of this predator. They are name after their necklace-shaped, sandy egg capsules (see here).

This one is about as big as they get. Their cousins in the North-East of the Pacific Ocean (Euspira lewisii) are something else though, take a look at this!

Portuguese Man O’ War

It is that time of the year again: gales, rain and darkness. The only good thing about late autumn/winter to me is that the wind blows interesting things on the beach. Portuguese Men o’ War (Physalia physalis) have been a common sight the last few years (see this post from 2017), perhaps more so than it used to be, but not sure this has been properly investigated. Yesterday we saw several dozen at Loe Bar near Helston, including the smallest specimen I have seen so far. No By-the-Wind-Sailors Vellella and no Violet Snails Janthina, and definitely no Porpita or Glaucus; maybe someday!

Aquarium Update

It has been over 20 months since I last posted about my Cornish native aquarium, so high time for a quick update with a few iPhone pics. In short, everything has ticked along nicely and nothing major has happened. Grey Top shells keep the glass pretty free of algae, I do not think I have ever had to clean the tank myself this year. I tried to keep a small piece of Dead Mans’ Fingers but it unfortunately perished. I think this mainly had to do that I was not able to attached it to the rock (using elastic bands). If I could get my hands on a piece already attached to a rock I think it would work.

My main goals is to keep some new species of anemone, and I will try to find some soon when diving. Currently, I still have the Daisy-, Dahlia-, Beadlet-, Strawberry-, Red Speckled- (see pic above) and Snakelocks Anemones. The Beadlets are producing lots of babies, some of which already have grown up to half the size of adults. I have each of the two Snakelocks colour morphs and both anemones have divided in two and grown quite a bit (see pic below). There are at least ten other species I could collect, and it would be great to have a whole collection. Anemones are generally easy to keep and very pretty! I feed them a few times a week with frozen foods such as artemia and I also handfeed them with bits of defrosted shrimp.

My Cornish Suckers (a species of clingfish) are still in there, but I only see them when feeding. I am reluctant to add more fish, as the tank has become a bit of a death trap with all the anemones! I have a common starfish, a few cushion starfish, some netted dogwhelks and a sea urchin. I will add some small prawns again as well since they are quite beautful and always on the move (and if they end up as anemone food, well, that is fine too). Occasionally, I add a random find to the tank, see below a colonial seasquirt on a shell I found on the beach and a shell with some Seabeard hydroids (Nemertesia antennina) attached that I picked up during a dive.

Hardware-wise, I am very happy with the Red Sea Reefer 170 and my AI Prime LED light. The LEDs are operating at very low capacity though, I use less than 10% of the output I think. I use a skimmer, but do not have biological filtration in the sump and rely solely on the gravel in the tank. I have a separate chiller loop going in and out of the sump. The tank currently is kept at 16C, which is not supercold for a coldwater tank, but it avoids problems with condensation (and saves some energy). My water changes involve a walk to the quay at the end of my street with two 10L jerry cans. I try to do a water change once a week but I do not always succeed. So hopefully I will be able to add some interesting species to the tank soon. Finally, watch this space for some very interesting coldwater aquarium news early next year…..

P.S. click on the ‘Aquarium Update’ tag on top to see all old posts on my aquarium

The Isles of Scilly: St. Martins

Two weeks ago we werelucky to spend a mid-week on St. Martins, one of the Scilly Islands. The Scillies are a group of tiny inhabited and uninhabited islands 28 miles off Lands’ End (before I moved to Cornwall eight years ago, I had never even heard of them…). The water over there is bluer, the sand is whiter and the viz much (much) better than in ‘mainland’ Cornwall, so a true paradise for snorkelling. I tried to get underwater as much as I could, in-between exploring the island (and going to the one pub). As we did not have much time, I mainly snorkelled in the seagrass just off Par Beach. It does not really look like England does it!? The seagrass was teeming with stalked jellyfish. However, because of the great viz I stuck with my fisheye lens, which meant it was tricky to photograph them. This species is Calvadosia campanulata, a protected and generally uncommon species, so worth recording (which I will get on when work is quieter and the weather is crappier). The ID was confirmed by expert David Fenwick, have a look at his excellent site on stalker jellies stauromedusae.co.uk (and his general site for marine species in the SW of the UK aphotomarine.com). Dave also pointed out some other organisms growing on the seagrass seen on these pics: the small red algae Rhodophysema georgei and the slime mold Labyrinthula zosterae (the black bits). As always, I learned something new talking to Dave. Snakelocks anemones were abundant on the seagrass, and the sand inbetween was full of Daisy anemones and Red-Speckled anemones Anthopleura balli (one of my favourites, they do well in my aquarium). As always, I bother crabs by sticking a lens in their face. Bigger Green Shore Crabs Carcinus maenas can get a bit feisty and attack the dome port (maybe because they see their own reflection). Finally a juvenile Straight-nosed Pipefish Nerophis ophidion (about 3 inches), a new one for me. I am always facinated by piepfish (and hope to one day see a seahorse). Unfortunately the shot is not in focus, I really needed a macrolens for this one. Still, you can marvel at the white sand and blue water! Some photos are allright, but I could do a lot better with a bit more time. Luckily we rebooked for a stay in spring already!  

Shells

I started a Cornish shell collection with my children recently. So yesterday we went to our local beach on Flushing to look for new additions. Lying down I took a really close look and was rewarded with a whole bunch of tiny species. On this photo, 14 species comfortably fit on a square inch. Species names in a clockwise spiral:

Bela powisiana

Tritia incrassata (Thick-lipped Dog Whelk)

Trivia arctica (Arctic Cowrie)

Tricolia pullus (Pheasant Shell)

Bittium reticulatum (Needle Whelk)

Littorina obtusata (Flat Periwinkle)

Calliostoma zizyphinum (Painted Top Shell)

Steromphola cineraria (Grey Top Shell)

Littorina saxatilis (Rough Periwinkle)

Tectura virginea (White Tortoise Shell Limpet)

Rissoa lilacina

Peringia ulvae (Mudsnail)

Nucella lapillus (Dog Whelk)

Steromphola umbilicalis (Flat Top Shell)