First attempts at macro photography

I recently posted my first photos taken with the nauticam CMC macro wetlens using stalked jellyfish as a subject. I since lost my lens, which I in large part blame on the bad fit of the adapter with which it is attached to the housing. The best thing in these cases is not to agonize over it too much, order a new one straight away and keep going, so that is what I did (also I am now a bit more careful of course). Here some more photos of macro subjects. Above a very easy subject as it is very common this time of year and also it does not move….Paddle worm egg capsules (probably Eulalia viridis). The individual eggs can be just made out in the gelatinous blob. Below, one of the more common nudibranch species Polycera quadrilineata. Nudibranchs come in all kinds of stunning colour variations and are very species rich and so are a favourite of macro photographers (see this old post hunting for them with David Fenwick in Newlyn, and check out the NE Atlantic Nudibranch facebook page for lots of eye candy). Tricky with the narrow depth of field to get the whole animal in focus. Mysid shrimp are quite common and beautiful little animals hovering about in small groups. They need dissection to determine which species it is, but this might be Leptomysis lingvura (around 10 mm). Finally, the colonial star Ascidian Botryllus schlosseri; these form colonies (‘systems’) where zooids have individual inhalant openings and a shared exhalant opening. They are common, sessile, flat, and come in a range of colours so they make ideal subjects for a beginning macro photographer.  Not only that, apart from fish they are our closest relatives in rock pools, which is most obvious in the tadpole-like larvae which have a dorsal notochord (a cartilage rod functioning as a backbone). I hope to devote a post to them later in the year.

a most peculiar animal

The rock around Falmouth is very soft in places, and when turning over large stones, sometimes they break and reveal interesting things (I have posted previously about the high density of worms in rocks). I recently had another rock crumbling on Castle Beach and I noticed something unusual-looking slipping away in its burrow. A Sipuncula (‘peanut worms’) or Echiura (‘spoon worms’) I thought, something not featured in any old guide anyway, so I browsed David Fenwick’s aphotomarine site where I quickly found the suspect: the Spoon worm Thalassema neptuni. The Echiura are recognised as a separate Phylum in most books, but recent research has revealed that they are not as special as they look: they are actually ‘ordinary’ Annelid worms (see this Open Access paper):

IMG_8621 The diversity of life within rocks is actually quite surprising. I have not taken a good look at all the types of worms yet, but this one stands out: a tiny Green leaf worm Eulalia viridis (looks like a sock puppet):

IMG_8643The boring bivalve Wrinkled rock borer Hiatella arctica (a juvenile):

IMG_8626And even a small Sea cucumber:

IMG_8636 Perhaps I should make a list of all the species living in the rock. Finally, on the rock surface, I sighted a small Sea hare Aplysia punctata for the first time in Cornwall:

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