March Seaweeds I

Last week it was time to check the state of the seaweeds and as expected they looked glorious. Unfortunately it was a bit windy and choppy and so the viz left something to be desired, argh! These are some of the better pics. I am in the process of creating a gallery of seaweed species (just reds to begin with), see the link at the very top of the blog. This is by no means a proper guide, as for that you often need more detail than just underwater impressions, but extra images might help in conjuction with a proper guide such as  the “Seaweeds of Britain and Ireland” Seasearch book. Anyway, I have started gathering old pics and hope to add more soon. The common flat red species in the photos above and below is very pretty but it is one of these species you need to look at under the microscope so I will not attempt to label it with a name (yet). Other species can be identified more easily, such as Under tngue weed Hypoglossum hypoglossoides (two photos below). Below, Thong Weed Himanthalia elongata, Little Fat Sausage Weed Champia parvula and Juicy Whorl Weed Chylocladia verticillata and a bit of Bushy rainbow wrack Cystoseira tamariscifolia covered in red epiphytes.

some more January Seaweed photos

img_9458It is my plan to post photos of seaweeds from one large rock pool in Falmouth every month. As I am making good on my new year’s resolution of going out to the beach, I have some more photos to post before it is February though. I am slowly learning to take better photos, but will also post ones that are not that great to cover more species. Below, Club bead- or Feathery tube weed Lomentaria clavellosa, the small epiphyte Little fat sausage weed Champia parvula (heavily cropped, I need a macro lens!) and Juicy whorl weed Chylocladia verticillata (with some of the edible Dulse Palmaria palmata on the left of it).img_9456img_9240img_9334I found quite a few more species but the photos ended up a bit meh, so I will have to go back and try harder. Below, two that ended up quite nice. Serrated wrack Fucus serratus covered with a variety of red epiphytes and a piece of washed up Sea oak Halidrys siliquosa.img_9326 img_9383

Rock Pooling in Penzance

IMG_5527It was a very nice day this Saturday, and the plan was to collect more seaweed species for a student project that I am supervising (see for an introduction my work blog here and for  project updates student Abi’s blog). We were very lucky to have David Fenwick Snr and his partner Carol of aphotomarine fame to help us to find and identify species (you might also know him through a variety of UK marine facebook groups). We took to the rocks beneath the Jubilee Pool in Penzance (the end of the Cornish main train line and both the most Southern en the most Western station in England). As the focus was to get new species for Abi’s project, I did not focus on photography or finding other species so I have only a few pictures to show. One exception of course was that we had to see some stalked jellyfish; this is one of the specialties of David and he has dedicated an entire website to these beautiful creatures: stauromedusaeUK. These little animals are related to jellyfish but are attached on rocks and seaweeds on the shore. Ten species have been recorded in the UK. One of the more common ones is the Spotted kaleidoscope jellyfish Haliclystus octoradiatus; although a crappy iPhone photo, the stalk, arms with secondary tentacles at the end, white nematocyst spots and gonadal sacs are clearly visible:IMG_5539On to the seaweeds: about 15 new samples were collected. A species we did not take was Creephorn Chondracanthus acicularis, which according to Davis memory was last recorded in Penzance in the 1880s (first pic). We did collect a good amount of the epiphyte Champia parvula (second pic). Unfortunately no time to pick up some Wakame from nearby Newlyn marina or go to a spot with some good Prasiola growth but all in all a very successful and enjoyable trip!IMG_5553

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